Easy Copper Soldering

IN THIS VIDEO WE WILL SHOW YOU THE BASICS OF SOLDERING COPPER WATER LINES FOR DOING NEW OR REPAIR WORK IN YOUR HOME
Video Rating: 4 / 5

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18 Responses to Easy Copper Soldering

  1. coastnative says:

    Excellent instructions. Thanks.

  2. tyoungb18 says:

    @RudeRaptor

    No capilary action will cause the solder to flow into the fitting as long as you heat the fitting. When I solder on vertical joints I heat the pipe and wipe away excess flux before soldering. If excess flux is heated on a vertical it will run down the pipe and the solder will tend to follow it leaving a drips and runs of solder down the pipe that will look bad. Just remember that solder will flow towards the heat. Hope that helped you out.

  3. RudeRaptor says:

    I wish we could have seen how you soldered the bottom of the T-shape pipe, that was running vertically. Would it run away from down, away from the fitting?

  4. tttvan1 says:

    very good

  5. albertawind says:

    Just a reminder that you want to put the flame on the fitting, not the pipe. Also, if you are soldering any fittings that have a valve you want to make sure that the valve is in the open position during your job.

  6. andrey162000 says:

    all potable water lines use non lead type solder, and 99% of the time the flux works with it. 3/4″ and 1/2″ lines are pretty strait forward systems

  7. leafygardens says:

    Good work thanks.

  8. WaterbugDesign says:

    Sand paper…old school. I use the combo brush for the outside too.

    Good tip binashref. I’ve never been sure how much solder to apply and so always go over board, way overboard.

    Soldering would be a good subject for many tips. Like how to stop from catching a joist on fire.

    On my current project I’ve used very little copper and instead tried both ipex and cpvc. Certainly easier, especially for me, who has to redo the layout a few times.

  9. HomeRemodelWorkshop says:

    Thanks for the time you took to share this information +++Bob

  10. michaelculhane says:

    Good video but you can have problems IF
    1 you use iron oxide sand paper.
    2 you use flux that is not compatible with the solder which should be non lead type.
    3 you don’t heat evenly around the pipe.
    Best to buy a kit with all the right elements.

  11. sweeteedon says:

    I always remember years ago I tried that and I only had 7 grain bread in the house and even though I soldered it well enough the faucet was plugged….Duh but I only had 7 grain . Had to dislodge the seeds.

  12. ecarman13 says:

    Good video to watch before my small sodering job

  13. steve49210 says:

    Remember, your pipes have to be completely empty in order to heat up your joints for soldering. If there is any water (in the pipe) in the area you want to solder, you will be there all day with the tourch and you will destroy the copper you are trying to seal. TOO MUCH heat is not good. Just like in the video, the solder will get sucked up and form a good seal.

    See the Trick…below, if you cannot empty the pipe of all water. It works for me.

  14. steve49210 says:

    Trick I was taught…
    If you are unable to properly drain all water from the pipe and it continues to drip, just jamb a bunch of bread (minus the crust) up inside the pipe. This will create a dam to keep the water back and give you enough time to heat up the joints to be soldered. Don’t worry about the bread, cause when you turn ON the water, the bread comes out the faucet as mush.

  15. steve49210 says:

    Also, remember if you do NOT completely drain the copper line of ALL water, you will never be able to solder any joints. The copper lines must be water-free !!!

  16. binashraf says:

    if you apply the solder to the bottom rather than the top,and wait for it to come around to the top,you get a neater job 🙂
    (capillary action)

  17. HomeRemodelWorkshop says:

    Actually Joe is older,therefor Bob is Joe’s younger,better looking brother. lol+++Bob

  18. CameronTingley says:

    I assume Joe is Bob’s brother?

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